Cohoes Black Bridge Rail-to-Trail Rehabilitation 

 

 

Preliminary design efforts included a detailed structural inspection and environmental investigations of the 450 foot long, three-span truss structure.

 

Since detailed historic records of the bridge were not available the project included development of detailed plans/sketches of the structure in order to accommodate the rehabilitation design and assist in future bridge condition inspection efforts.

 

The bridge inspection and investigation services included an underwater (diving) inspection and a 100% hands-on inspection of the substructure and truss superstructure components.

 

B&L provided preliminary and final design services as well as full-time construction administration and inspection services.

This bridge rehabilitation project converted the former Delaware & Hudson Railroad Bridge over the Mohawk River (the "Black Bridge") into a scenic bicycle and pedestrian rail-to-trail crossing between Van Schaick Island and Green Island. This project is a critical component of a larger connector trail linkage planned from the Mohawk Hudson Bike-Hike Trail to Peebles Island and the Lake Champlain Bikeways network. 

 

The Cohoes Black Bridge will be a connecting route along the New York State Canal Corp trail system.  The bridge provides a connecting route between the Mohawk Hudson Bike-Hike Trail and the Champlain Canalway Trail.  A cyclist can now leave the Corning Preserve and travel to Peebles Island and the Champlain Canalway north without having to cross SR787.

 

 

The bridge was a former Delaware and Hudson Rail Bridge that was abandoned back in the 1970s after the rail line was discontinued.  This project has been an excellent example of Public Private Partnership.  The bridge and the trail bed in Cohoes was purchased by the Open Space Conservancy to provide for an off road bike hike trail to allow riverfront access from Green Island to Cohoes and continuing on to Peebles Island and Saratoga County. 

 

 

 

 

Ribbon cutting ceremony,
October 17, 2013